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Courses in English

Undergradute Program in Political Science and International Relations:

 

The program is conducted in Turkish and English. It covers introductory courses in political science, political theory, political history and international relations as well as various elective courses. 30 per cent of the courses offered at the department are conducted in English. Below you can find a list of courses in English:

 

Political Theory I and II

Comparative Government

Comparative Politics

Vocational English I and II

International Relations I and II

Theory of International Relations

Current Issues in International Relations

Aspects of Regime Transitions

New Perspectives in Turkish Foreign Policy

War and Conflict in International Relations

Diplomatic Correspondence

Advanced English I-II-III

English For Business

Politics and Cinema

 

 

Political Theory I (2nd year, Required): The course is designed to enable students to understand political theories of different periods in their original context. Basic political ideas and assumptions from Perikles to Machiavelli are examined critically. The predominant figures in the history of political thought are evaluated in a comparative and critical perspective.

Political Theory II (2nd year, Required): The course is designed to enable students to understand political theories of different periods in their original context. Basic political ideas and assumptions from Hobbes to Marx are examined critically. The predominant figures in the history of political thought are evaluated in a comparative and critical perspective.

International Relations I (3rd  year, Required): The course focuses on international relations and world politics starting from the beginning of the 20th century; first and second World Wars, causes and consequences, the emergence of the Cold War. It aims to provide an account of international politics during the twentieth century by following a trajectory of major events and milestones in international relations. While doing so, the focus is the policies of major powers, reasons and motives for international action, consequences and influences of major events in international politics.

International Relations II (3rd year, Required): The course focuses on international relations since the 1970s, detent process, the end of the Cold War and its effects, international relations in different regions of the world, the emergence of a new international system. The focus will be on the policies of major powers, reasons and motives for international action, consequences and influences of major events in international politics.

Comparative Government (3rd year, Required):  The course focuses on political regimes and forms of government; democratic and authoritarian regimes; patterns of representative democracy in capitalist societies; the political executive: parliamentary, presidential and semi-presidential forms and their formation. Main objective of the course is to educate students on the contemporary political structures and institutions.

Comparative Politics (3rd year, Required): The course introduces students to the main theories, concepts, approaches, and methods in comparative politics. Its specific focus is on key comparative concepts such as the state, political culture, social class and class conflict, political development and modernization, underdevelopment and dependency.

Vocational English I (2nd year, Required): The course introduces students to the key concepts and readings in the political science discipline in English. It aims to improve students’ reading, speaking and writing abilities in English.

Vocational English II (3rd year, Required): The course introduces students to the key concepts and readings in the political science discipline in English. It aims to improve students’ reading, speaking and writing abilities in English.

Theories of International Relations (4th year, Required): The course aims to inform students about different approaches and theories in International Relations.

Elective Courses

War and Conflict: The course aims to inform and educate students on the causes and consequences of war and conflict in the international system. Theories of war and conflict, causes of war and conflict, causes international peace, and new threats to international security are among the topics that are covered in this course.

US Foreign Policy under Obama: The main aim of the course is to understand the transformation and change in US foreign policy on the basis of the dramatic changes in international system with a special reference to historical and practical events. Specific attention is given to the U.S. foreign policy under Barack Obama.

Aspects of Regime Transitions : The course is designed to examine how societies transform from authoritarian regimes to democracy reckon with the atrocities of the past. In the first part of the course, the theoretical framework of the subject matter is drawn and a set of questions is formulated. In the second part of the course (weeks 7th to 15th), transition processes in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia and Serbia in the aftermath of the most recent ethnic conflict are analyzed as case studies.

Cinema and Politics: It aims to provide analysis of Major Film Movements and their socio-political background.

New Perspectives in Turkish Foreign Policy: The course aims to analyze the current developments in Turkish foreign policy on systemic, regional and international level from a historical perspective.

Current Issues in International Relations: The course aims to provide a better understanding of the current state of the world politics. It undertakes a continuous historical analysis regarding how the world politics evolved into its current state and focus on the most important characteristics of the current world order. Each week, we elaborate one of the most crucial as well as contentious issues of today’s world politics.

Diplomatic Correspondence: Basic knowledge on foreign policy, diplomacy and diplomatic correspondence.

 

 

 

 

 

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─░lgili d├Âk├╝manlar